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Posted June 6, 2007


Contact:
Anne Katahira-Sims, MAVIN Foundation Executive Director

Remembering Ramona E. Douglass


(Seattle)
MAVIN Foundation board and staff extend our condolences to the family and friends of Ramona E. Douglass who passed away last week. Ms. Douglass was a civil rights activist for nearly three decades. She was one of the most prominent figures in the multiracial movement in America since its inception. As a U.S. Department of Commerce federal appointee to the 2000 Census Advisory Committee in Washington, D.C., beginning in 1995, she consistently represented multiracial community interests before Congress, the national media, and the Executive Office of the President.

Ms. Douglass was a co-founder of the Association of MultiEthnic Americans (AMEA) and member of the board of directions since its founding in 1988, serving in the capacities of vice president (1988-1994), president (1994-1999), director of media and public relations (2000-2005), and member of the Advisory Council until her death. She authored articles on the mixed race experience, including "The Evolution of the Multiracial Movement," the second chapter of MAVIN Foundation's Multiracial Child Resource Book.

She was a senior sales manager and corporate trainer for a medical manufacturing company in California's San Fernando Valley.

MAVIN Foundation received a message from a friend of Ms. Douglass, reminding us that her deep commitment to working across difference and division to do what was best for mixed heritage people and families was perhaps, the most inspiring part of her impressive legacy.

 

 





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Looking back at eight remarkable years!




Matt Kelley founded MAVIN magazine as a 19-year-old freshman at Wesleyan Univ.




MAVIN's premier issue hit newsstands on Jan. 29, 1999.




In 2000, MAVIN magazine became the nonprofit MAVIN Foundation.




Recently, Kelley focused his efforts on advocating on behalf of policy issues.




In 2005, MAVIN sent five 20-somethings on a 10,000-mile trek to raise awareness of multiracial issues.